Navy officer who shot down Air Force jet won’t be promoted after all

A Senate committee has refused to approve a promotion to admiral for a Navy officer who, as a young fighter pilot during a training mission, deliberately shot down an Air Force plane whose flier has suffered a life of pain from his forced ejection.

The Senate Armed Service Committee took no confirmation vote on the nomination of Capt. Timothy W. Dorsey as the 112th Congress ended.

Because the Senate did not act, the nomination goes back to the White House. The Navy has the option of trying to resubmit his nomination during the 113th Congress, which convened Thursday.

The Washington Times first reported in February that President Obama had submitted Capt. Dorsey to the Senate despite the officer’s misdeed as an F-14 Tomcat pilot 25 years ago during an exercise over the Mediterranean Sea.

A source close to the committee told The Times on Thursday that the Navy was aware of his checkered past but did not tell the office of Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, which forwarded the nomination to the White House.

Committee staff members read The Times story on Feb. 16, the same day the nomination officially reached the Senate. It arrived absent any information about the incident or the impact it had on the shot-down pilot, the source said.

The committee expects the Pentagon to “fully inform it on any potential adverse information,” the source said, adding that the panel sent a letter to Mr. Panetta’s office asking for full disclosure.

The source also said the Navy and Pentagon “did not fully grasp” that there was a victim, retired Air ForceCol. Mike Ross, who has undergone seven back surgeries and lives in constant pain.

Col. Ross told The Times Thursday the Navy “made a mistake” because he believes the promotion board did not thoroughly investigate Capt. Dorsey’s background.

“Obviously, there was a mistake in the Navy’s records check before they brought somebody up for promotion with that kind of a mark on their record,” he said.

Capt. Dorsey told The Times: “I still look forward to the confirmation process and look forward to confirmation by the Senate.”

In 1987, while flying off the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga, a Lt. j.g. Timothy W. Dorsey fired a missile at an Air Force F-4 reconnaissance jet piloted by then-Lt. Ross. Lt. Ross. He and his backseat officer ejected as the F-4 plunged into the sea.

A Navy investigation called Lt. Dorsey’s decision an “illogical act” that “raises substantial doubt as to his capacity for good, sound judgment.”

“The September 22, 1987, destruction of USAF RF-4C was not the result of an accident, but the consequence of a deliberate act,” the investigator wrote. “His subsequent reaction [to the radio command] demonstrated an absolute disregard of the known facts and circumstances.”

The Navy banned him from flying for life.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks