Immigration activists march on home of Kansas secretary of state

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Nearly 300 activists with a leftist, pro-immigration group marched on the Kansas secretary of state’s home over the weekend, dropping shoes on his lawn that they said belonged to “the fathers he’s deported.”

Sunflower Community Action nonprofit members branded Kansas’ Kris Kobach as a “King of Hate” on its group Twitter feed, accusing him of being the brains behind Arizona’s tough immigration law and the reason for so much perceived backlash against illegal immigrants, The Blaze reported.


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The march was aimed at drawing national attention to Mr. Kobach as a discriminatory secretary of state, organizers said, in the Kansas City Star.

“Every time immigration is tied with Kansas, people automatically think of Kris Kobach, who has made a name for himself and a living off of pushing for self-deportation laws at the national level,” Sunflower Community Action Executive Director Sulma Arias said, in the report. “We want the country to know that our values as Kansans move us to commonsense reform with a path to citizenship. Kobach does not represent Kansas values.”

Protesters stood outside the official’s home, chanting in Spanish, The Blaze reported. Video taken of the protest and posted online showed the large gathering, with some filing up to the porch to deposit the shoes.

A voice says: “This is Secretary of State of Kansas Kris Kobach’s home. We found out where he lived, and we came to visit him. We’ve left these shoes here so that maybe Mr. Kobach can try to fill them. These are the shoes of the fathers that he’s deported — that have been deported by his laws that he’s lobbied for and passed. Kobach separates families,” The Blaze reported.

The group’s basic principles are that all are owed basic “human rights” that include “food, shelter, medical care, education and a job,” it says on its website.

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