Topic - Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or sometimes USEPA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States charged with protecting human health and the environment, by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress. The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon and began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon submitted a reorganization plan to Congress and it was ratified by committee hearings in the House and Senate. The agency is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the president and approved by Congress. The current administrator is Lisa P. Jackson. The EPA is not a Cabinet department, but the administrator is normally given cabinet rank. The agency has approximately 17,000 full-time employees.Also see [http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/tables/07s0483.xls U.S. Census Bureau spreadsheet] - Source: Wikipedia

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Jamison: New hope for ex-Kerr-McGee site cleanup

    Maranatha Faith Center Pastor Steve Jamison sees the $5.15 billion settlement from Anadarko Petroleum Corporation as a major turning point in the 15-year fight his East Columbus church has led to remediate the contamination from the former Kerr-McGee site and protect the safety of those who live near it.

  • Illustration on the EPA attack on coal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    DUNCAN: A common-sense approach to coal

    The year ahead could have a transformative impact on America's energy landscape.

  • Superfund label stirs Silverton's concern

    San Juan County Commissioners are concerned after scientists and officials from the Environmental Protection Agency proposed Superfund designation for parts of Silverton polluted by mining operations, worried it might hurt their image as a tourist destination.

  • FILE - This Jan. 9, 2009, file photo shows equipment inside a pilot plant in Scotland, S.D., that turns corn cob into cellulosic ethanol, a precursor to a commercial-scale biorefinery planned for Emmetsburg, Iowa. Biofuels made from corn leftovers after harvest are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a cleaner oil alternative from the start and will help climate change. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers, File)

    EPA biofuel mandate scaled back to reflect reality

    The Obama administration is significantly reducing the amount of cellulosic biofuelsrefiners will have to prove they blended into gasoline last year, acknowledging that the market lagged far behind government projections.

  • "The Renewable Fuel Standard was designed to drive investment in and the development of advanced biofuels. It has succeeded in doing that, if not at the pace Congress originally had hoped," said Sen. Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican and a supporter of ethanol. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Running on empty: EPA slashes biofuel goals because of ethanol shortage

    Just a few years ago, it looked as though ethanol and its politically potent lobby would reshape the U.S. energy landscape, but now even the federal government has been forced to acknowledge that its projections for the biofuel simply don't match reality.

  • EPA scales back biofuel mandate to reflect reality

    The Obama administration is significantly reducing the amount of cellulosic biofuels refiners will have to prove they blended into gasoline last year, acknowledging that the market lagged far behind government projections.

  • FILE - This Jan. 9, 2009, file photo shows equipment inside a pilot plant in Scotland, S.D., that turns corn cob into cellulosic ethanol, a precursor to a commercial-scale biorefinery planned for Emmetsburg, Iowa. Biofuels made from corn leftovers after harvest are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a cleaner oil alternative from the start and will help climate change. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers, File)

    Study: Fuels from corn waste not better than gas

    Biofuels made from the leftovers of harvested corn plants are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, a study shows, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a much cleaner oil alternative and will help combat climate change.

  • Sunlight streams onto the 43-acre Maywood Solar Farm in Indianapolis on Tuesday, April 15, 2013. The 8-megawatt solar farm completed last month is the nation's first utility-scale solar farm on a federal Superfund site, built on a portion of a former industrial site tainted by decades of coal-tar refining and wood-treatment with the toxic chemical creosote. The farm's solar panels feed power into Indianapolis Power & Light's electrical grid. (AP Photo/Rick Callahan)

    Largest US solar farm on Superfund site now online

    The nation's largest solar farm built atop a federal Superfund site is now generating power on a tract of land in Indianapolis tainted by a long-shuttered plant's wood-treating operations.

  • Lowe's agrees to minimize lead dust, pay fine

    Lowe's Home Centers has agreed to pay a $500,000 federal penalty in settling claims that its contractors in at least nine states broke environmental rules for addressing lead paint dust during home renovation projects, two federal agencies announced Thursday.

  • FILE - In this April 3, 2014 file photo giant machines dig for brown coal at the open-cast mining Garzweiler in front of a smoking power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany. The U.N.’s expert panel on climate change is preparing a new report this weekend outlining the cuts in greenhouse gases, mainly CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels, required in coming decades to keep global warming in check. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)

    EPA didn't track own air pollution program — report

    The Environmental Protection Agency hasn't bothered to track whether one of its key pollution reduction programs is actually having an effect, according to a new review by the agency's internal watchdog.

  • North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple addresses representatives from about two dozen states at the Energy-Producing States Summit in Bismarck, N.D, Wednesday, April 16, 2014. The two-day summit began Wednesday and was hosted by the state Health Department and Bismarck-based Basin Electric Power Cooperative. (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Tom Stromme)

    Officials gather in ND to discuss new EPA rules

    North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple on Wednesday signaled a potential legal challenge to proposed federal rules aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants and oil refineries.

  • Less energy use, better cars help drive decreases in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions

    Americans are spending less time on the road and in more fuel-efficient cars, helping to drive an annual decrease in the amount of greenhouse gasses. An inventory on the Environmental Protection Agency says emissions were down 3.4 percent in the U.S.

  • Court upholds EPA emission standards

    A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's first emission standards for mercury and other hazardous air pollutants from coal- and oil-fired power plants.

  • Senators back state management of carbon emissions

    Louisiana could have its own, less stringent plan for implementing the Environmental Protection Agency's limits on carbon dioxide emissions, under a proposal that got the approval Tuesday of the Senate Environmental Quality Committee.

  • Cleanup plan for Niagara River costs $380 million

    The Buffalo Sewer Authority will spend $380 million over the next 20 years to reduce the amount of untreated sewage and stormwater runoff flowing into the Niagara River, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday.

More Stories →

Happening Now